Comic Review: Lone Ranger Green Hornet #1 (Dynamite)

Two generations of heroes team up for the first time ever! Both Lone Ranger and Green Hornet got their start on radio. Lone Ranger first appeared in 1933, followed by […]

Two generations of heroes team up for the first time ever!

Both Lone Ranger and Green Hornet got their start on radio. Lone Ranger first appeared in 1933, followed by the Green Hornet 1936. Back then, it was established that the Green Hornet (Britt Reid) was the Lone Ranger’s (John Reid) grandnephew. But other than some mentions on the radio show, and in the comics, we really never saw this legacy of heroes team-up. That is until now.

Michael Uslan, who mainly known as a movie producer, has taken on the task of teaming up the Lone Ranger with the Green Hornet. Uslan does a great job here. The series is published by Dynamite Entertainment, and Uslan draws on the Lone Ranger series by Brett Matthews and Sergio Cariello, and Green Hornet: Year One by Matt Wagner and Aaron Campbell. Personally, I feel this very important to reference what has already been established, so I love that part.

Gioncanni Timpano art really compliments the story. Timpano has a nice flow of action in the sequence. And nice pacing between panels.

The story is one of transition. It has a retired Lone Ranger and a pre-Green Hornet Britt Reid.  It takes place in 1936 Chicago, during the backdrop of the early American Nazi sympathizers. From what it seems so far, it looks like this story will be an origin story of the Green Hornet.

I’m hooked, but I might be biased because I’ve loved the Lone Ranger and the Green Hornet. To have this family of heroes in one book is too good to pass up.

Brian Isaacs - Executive Editor / Publisher

About Brian Isaacs - Executive Editor / Publisher

An avid comic collector/reader for over 40 years and self-proclaimed professor of comicology, Brian original started up the site Pendragon's Post to share his voice. Well that voice has been shared, and evolved into The Fanboy Factor. Brian is an advocate for remembering comic roots, and that we don't forget what was created in the past, and encourage everyone to read it as well. When not swimming in geek culture, he can be seen corrupting..introducing his young son to comics, much to his wife's chagrin.