Comic Review: Justice League Vs Suicide Squad #2 (DC Comics)

“ It’s a shame that she’ll always know you’re nothing but a hired gun.” With the players now on the field, the Justice League, and the Suicide Squad go at […]

“ It’s a shame that she’ll always know you’re nothing but a hired gun.”

With the players now on the field, the Justice League, and the Suicide Squad go at it in the second chapter of this miniseries event. As the battle ensues, Maxwell Lord addresses his plans to get revenge on Amanda Waller by assembling his own demolition squad hell-bent on exacting revenge on Waller while simultaneously trying to save the world. How does Maxwell Lord plan to save the world? Will the suicide squad be able to hold their own against the league? Or will they fall?

Joshua Williamson continues to weave the tale of deceit and confrontation between the Justice league and the Suicide Squad. Unfortunately, what readers will expect on the cover, will most likely never happen within this issue. If you expected Maxwell Lord’s team consisting of Lobo, Rustam, Doctor Polaris, Johnny Sorrows, and  Legionnaire villain Emerald Empress to actually enter the fray in this issue, unfortunately, they don’t. Their inclusion is minor due to plot and set up since the main focus are the two title forces at war. Williamson does show that he has some great pawns at play in terms of this chess board of an event that he is crafting. I hope he can execute it well, and maybe even address some of the continuity problems that plague the DCU such as Emerald Empress who hasn’t been seen in the New 52 since the Pre-Flashpoint universe. His consistency of character interaction and behavior is great, although his Batman is a little weird in terms of his discussion with Deadshot. Regardless, other that Williamson keeps a good pace and writes the action well.

Although it is a joy to see Jason Fabok’s art, Tony Daniel takes the art duties for this issue. Upon my first viewing of the first few pages, I was expecting to see Fabok, but when I noticed the major shift in art style, it was a bit jarring. From first glance, I thought Jim Lee was drawing this issue until I realized it was Tony Daniel, which isn’t bad. Tony Daniel as an illustrator tends to be a more dutiful and his art is usually as enjoyable as it is in this issue. It’s very clean in style and paneling. While this issue isn’t as strong as the first issue, but nonetheless it’s still a good issue.  I’d give it a 7 out of 10. Definitely, pick it up.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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