Comic Review: Nightwing #20 (DC Comics)

Writer Tim Seeley and illustrator Javier Fernandez wrap up the final of the Nightwing Must Die arc. After the kidnapping of Robin (Damian), Nightwing finally comes face to face with […]

Writer Tim Seeley and illustrator Javier Fernandez wrap up the final of the Nightwing Must Die arc.

After the kidnapping of Robin (Damian), Nightwing finally comes face to face with the culprit who is revealed as none other than Dr. Hurt. With Robin’s life dangling by a thread, Nightwing must do whatever it takes to save Robin before Dr. Hurt finishes the job on the Boy Wonder. Will Nightwing compromise his code of heroism to save Robin? What is Dr. Hurt’s secret plan? And what does the future hold for Nightwing?

Tim Seeley has been doing a fine job on this title, getting inside the head of Dick Grayson aka Nightwing and nailing what sets Grayson apart from Batman and his contemporaries. Seeing Grayson and Damian Wayne (Robin) develop a stronger bond that is very reminiscent to the Morrison era is very welcoming to see. In terms of the story, it’s good. While the conclusion is as fantastic as the earlier issues, it still holds up well. Seeing Nightwing facing potential aspects and contemplating the idea of fatherhood is good to see. There is a scene in which Nightwing talks about what it takes to be Batman, and parallels it with the importance within the concept of Robin as a mantle that really reflects this title as a whole.

Every scene that displays Nightwing, Deathwing, Dr. Hurt, Robin and Nightwing’s girlfriend Shawn, each character parallels the concepts of mentorship, legacy, and identity. They represent all the paths that Nightwing could have ended up or could potentially become, for better or for worse. Seeing Nightwing struggling to maintain his personal life and his superhero life is something that makes readers wish that he would be writing Spider-Man at some point. It’s one of the aspects that make the narrative engaging to read. What makes this title and book so great is that Nightwing as a series isn’t about brooding, but about running with the best stuff that life throws at an individual and making the most of it. Seeley makes great effort to specify why Nightwing is an important figure, not just among the Robin’s, or The Bat Family, but also to the DC Universe. There are some elements that could be possibly for shadows as to Nightwing’s future and his influence beyond the present. It’s unsure whether that’ll be something that Seeley will revisit, but hopefully, he will.

Javier Fernandez’s artwork continues to be a driving force in regards to the key ingredients that makes this title great. Fernandez’s sleek and stylistic imagery really makes this series stand out. The narrative elements are maintained with Fernandez’s art, and the paneling /layouts are solid.

This issue manages to balance out the dark and light elements that at times the Batman related titles have difficulty. Maintaining. It’s good to see characters like Nightwing smile and content with being a superhero, because when you can do what he can do, how could one not be happy? Aside from Joshua Williamson’s The Flash, and Tomasi and Gleason’s Superman title, Seeley and Fernandez manage to make a fun, enjoyable superhero comic, where it’s fun to be a superhero despite the grave situations. Nightwing is an example of that, and so is this comic.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

About Anthony Andujar Jr.