Comic Review: Winnebago Graveyard TPB (Image)

Image Comics’ Winnebago Graveyard is collected in trade format and is quick and horrific. It’s a horrible tale of horror, horror and more horror. How can something so horrible start […]

Image Comics’ Winnebago Graveyard is collected in trade format and is quick and horrific.

It’s a horrible tale of horror, horror and more horror. How can something so horrible start so normally?
A family of three is on their vacation through the American southwest. Mom, dad, and the 13 year old son.

They’re driving a Winnebago (hint).

When they stop along the roadside to check out the Corbis Carnival, it all starts to go wrong.
You see, they have stumbled upon a place where the residents kill outsiders!
Cue the chase scenes, the horror, the scalping, the explosions, the monsters and more horror!!

Yes, it’s that type of book.

Winnebago Graveyard is written by Steve Niles, art by Alison Sampson, color art by Stephane Paitreau and Eiko Takayama.

It’s a quick read. There is minimal dialogue, and lots and lots of large LARGE drawings, meaning that you can gasp and gulp your way through this volume in say, twenty minutes. The art, besides being large, with plenty of black, is quite well done. The character expressions are excellent, and Sampson has a way of conveying a claustrophobic feeling in the wide open southwest; no easy feat!

I could have used a bit more plot in this miniseries; there are no hidden character motivations, no sudden revelations, or unusually strong plot twists.
This is straight-ahead horror à la Stephen King, thank you very much.

Contained in this breeze-through volume are four chapters of the saga, covering 98 pages. Then there are additional character sketches, editorials, wiki pages on various horror topics, and variant covers of the original comics.

Image Comics Winnebago Graveyard Trade Paperback 132 pages of content for $16.99 Rated T for Teens

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!