Comic Review: The Jetsons #3 (DC Comics)

DC continues their “The Jetsons” ‘blast from the past’ miniseries with issue 3. Written by Jimmy Palmiotti, with interior art by Pier Brito, colors by Alex Sinclair, The Jetsons blends […]

DC continues their “The Jetsons” ‘blast from the past’ miniseries with issue 3.

Written by Jimmy Palmiotti, with interior art by Pier Brito, colors by Alex Sinclair, The Jetsons blends the 1960’s Hanna Barbera TV show with an updated, ‘teen plus’ tone.

George, the dad, is now a workaholic, and Jane, the mom, is busy busy too. Rosie the robot-maid, is now actually George’s dead mom, her brain implanted into a robot.

Life in the future isn’t as leisurely as we might have thought. Things are gritty for the Jetsons. You see, global warming has buried the earth in water. Plus, a meteor made mostly of water has hit earth too, adding even more water. So people live on islands, floating above the water. Oh, and the meteor is buried in the deep ocean, and is acting peculiarly. It’s glowing and seems alive!

Things are getting more tense in this issue, as story elements from the previous two issues develop; the underwater meteor is becoming even more animated and dangerous!

My take on the miniseries is that this Jetsons is partly reminiscent of the original tv show but colder, more distant, and world-weary. Marital difficulties, strained family relationships. Lots of isolation and ‘alone time’.

The basic storyline is solid, but the pacing is slow. Everyday scenes occupy pages and pages! We don’t need to hear every word of dialogue in a scene; it’s okay for the writer to summarize and abbreviate… after all, this is comics!

But if you are curious about this title, check it out. It combines sci-fi with underwater exploration and mixes in liberal doses of modern family drama.

DC Comics The Jetsons #3, $3.99 for 23 pages of content. Rated Teen

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!