Comic Review: The New World #1 (Image)

A bunch of nuclear devices have detonated over 5 US cities. It’s 2037, and it’s The New World #1, from Image. It’s also another post-apocalyptic story in a post-apocalyptic world. […]

A bunch of nuclear devices have detonated over 5 US cities. It’s 2037, and it’s The New World #1, from Image.

It’s also another post-apocalyptic story in a post-apocalyptic world. But this story is impeccibly told. From writer Ales Kot, and the visual team of: Designer Tom Muller, Artist Tradd Moore, colour artist Heather Moore and flat colourist Yesflat, this is a fine comic indeed.

Reading this first issue is a rare and magnificent experience. You know the feeling you get when you see a movie on the big screen with 3D and surround sound? The sheer luxury of the ride, watching the deep shots unfold, sharp as a pin. Hearing the rumble beneath your seat, following the slow track of the camera. This comic is like that.

The story is that there are cops, and there are a few malcontents, who delight in annoying the establishment. Almost a throwback to the 1960’s in terms of culture and counterculture. But in 2017, the revolution is televised, and so is everything else. In The New Los Angeles, Stella is a Guardian, upholding the law. Live, on TV. What happens when Stella, a predictable enough Guardian, starts to vibe with a counterculture fellow?

The story is tight and entrancing, and like I’ve said above, the artwork is simply astonishing. It is high res, detailed, carefully curated. It is a lesson book on entertaining while impressing a reader. The colouring is beyond the limits of the typical comic book: treated like an integral element in support of the story.

Enough of my praise! Please pick up a copy of this first issue, and let’s keep our eyes open for the next one!

Image, The New World #1, $4.99 for 64 pages of content, Mature

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!