Comic Review: Aquaman #51 (DC Comics)

Aquaman is rebuilding his life back on the surface and is called upon to pick up an individual that bears similar abilities as him. Meanwhile, Mera is struggling to maintain […]

Aquaman is rebuilding his life back on the surface and is called upon to pick up an individual that bears similar abilities as him.

Meanwhile, Mera is struggling to maintain her hold as queen of Atlantis, with many questioning who she will marry as king in the absence of Aquaman. As Aquaman and Mera deal with rebuilding their lives, Black Manta returns to enact his biggest scheme yet. What does Black Manta have it store for Aquaman? Will Mera find a way to resolve her situation with Aquaman? And what lies ahead for the absent King of Atlantis?

This series has managed to be a surprisingly pleasant read as Deconnick continues to build upon the mythology of Aquaman. Truthfully I’m not much of an Aquaman can, but because of the writing and solid characterization of the character, has made him the most interesting that he’s ever been. Even the Mera segments are well written, witnessing Mera struggle with her advisors who are hell-bent on making Mera marry someone that would unite Atlantis rather than divide it makes for an interesting read.

The biggest thing about this book that I enjoy is seeing Aquaman really interacting with the people of his hometown, along with the gods that he has brought with him to stay. This is something very different for the character but all the more welcoming, and proves to be a series that will invite new fandom due to writing alone. Admittedly, much like all of the other books that have the year of the villain banner, the book does have a pretty cool stinger that promises exciting developments for Black Manta, which will surely have readers curious to read about what happens next.

In regards to the art, it’s amazing and beautiful. There’s something about Rocha’s pencils and layouts that make the book have a very energetic and crisp feel that makes the book stand out visually. Rocha’s pencils, coupled with Henriques inks, Cowels lettering, and Gho’s colors stick the landing in every way, making this issue and the series thus far, look cinematically majestic. Rocha, Henrique, and Gho make a solid art team, making this series look like a really beautiful indie book. To be honest, this series has an indie tone to it, but it works to its advantage since the series itself feels and narratively is more different than any Aquaman book that has come before it thus far.

I don’t often do this, but sometimes there are some books that are worth checking out that is outside of your usual comfort reads, and we need that. I recommend picking up this book and adding it to your pull list. Decconick is weaving a series that I think will make Aquaman a bigger deal than his New 52 run. It has good writing, good plot, and amazing art, don’t miss out.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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