Comic Review: Batman And The Outsiders #9 (DC Comics)

“Sometimes the best way forward is to stop moving.” In the aftermath of losing a loved one to Ra’s Al Ghul, Black Lightning seeks answers, enraged by the turn of […]

“Sometimes the best way forward is to stop moving.”

In the aftermath of losing a loved one to Ra’s Al Ghul, Black Lightning seeks answers, enraged by the turn of events. The Outsiders know that Black Lightning is being targeted by Ra’s, and they must do everything they can to protect him from the League of Assassins and from himself. What will Black Lightning do as a response to the loss he is dealt? Can the Outsiders prevent one of their own from going rogue? And who will keep the team together?

The writing: Hill does an amazing job at exploring how Jefferson (Black Lightning) processes the loss of a loved one, never losing sight of what makes the character who they are despite tragedy. In life, situations happen and despite the terrible outcomes, people do their best to make the most of their situations to show that people can still do good despite mourning. That’s something that Hill displays really well. He also does a good job at exploring the effect that one’s environment has on one’s outlook on life, and the need to stray and change from that environment so that they can leave it better than they found it.

Hill continues to establish a strong sense of community with the members of the Outsiders that continues to make it an enjoyable series. Whether it’s Jefferson being at odds against Batman, or Orphan and Duke being one of the best Dynamic Duo’s on the team, Hill is able to continually demonstrate his understanding of the Outsiders that makes the book worthwhile to read. One thing that’s interesting is seeing how the events that happened in the main Batman title has trickled into this title, leaving many writers associated with the Bat-books to tackle the fallout of that. Thankfully Hill sticks the landing by acknowledging the continuity that’s happening within the DC titles, which helps to make it feel cohesive to continuity without being letting it overshadow the work that he is doing on this title.

The art: Dexter Soy delivers some amazing layouts, making the most of every page and panel within this issue. His art is aesthetically pleasing given that his style is a nice combination of Eastern and Western influences, that makes the book visually cool to look at. Soy has the ability to make everything look cool, leaving no room for a visually dull moment. Coupled with the colors provided by Veronica Gandini and good letter work by Clayton Cowels, they create another installment that’s worth rereading until the next issue.

I feel that this book is one of the underrated team titles that focus on members of the Bat-Family that feel cohesive which hasn’t been done in some time. I definitely recommend picking this book up for new comic book day.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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