Comic Review: Rising Sun #1 (IDW Publishing)

IDW Comics brings you a team of Japanese warriors fighting to protect the country in Rising Sun on its first issue. If you’re a fan of Japanese culture, then you’ll […]

IDW Comics brings you a team of Japanese warriors fighting to protect the country in Rising Sun on its first issue.

If you’re a fan of Japanese culture, then you’ll realize when you wake up in the morning to see the rising sun, or as if you’re playing Samurai Showdown on SNK. However, the story will influence Japanese history. The story is written by Ron Marz and David Rodriguez and drawn by Martin Coccolo. The thing about this story focuses on spiritual mythology where the warriors have their clans and worship the power of the gods. However, the whole country is at war recently.

The front cover of the comic shows that the ninja warriors of a different clan joined forces to take down the blue dragon. I expect as much, but how did these warriors form an alliance in the first place? If the dragon was not threatening enough, then what is the real threat of Japan? Well, the story goes that everyone is fighting against the dragon, but they were overwhelmed. And it took place in the 12th century of the town of Kanazawa. But, the monk was heavily injured and almost a brink of death, and then some healer revived him by using some ritual just to heal him from his injuries. But that’s not the only problem that they got into, their travels went into some trouble when they fight against mythical creatures, even zombies. What would happen next on their journey?

The story is kind of eerie, just like the Unearth graphic novel from Image, the warriors are venturing around the country just to save it at all costs. Even so, the comic comes from any Japanese folklore from history even at a visit to the museum. But according to the comic, the story influences as a ninja clan were these warriors travel to eliminate figures with a simple command like a game perhaps. The illustrations are more realistic, more than seeing the illustrations of D&D. But the good thing about this comic is that it shows any sense of Japanese mythology between time and prosperity, as the blue dragon for example. Chinese dragons exist a long time ago, but how did one of the dragons end up in Japan? Did Seijuro Hiko introduce the true way of the final quickdraw sword technique to future swordsmen like Kenshin or Leonardo? Can’t forget that. Then again, why did the monk get injured to get to reasoning with the dragon? Well, no matter, if you rather want to read a comic where the Japanese warriors go out on a journey to save the country then this is for you.

About Kevin Bermeo

I'm a New Yorker Artist, and I traveled a lot. I enjoy making comics, illustrations, paintings, and digital art. Besides drawing, I'm also a writer, I used to be a Gamer, and I love adventures, food, and dragons.