Comic Review: WW84 #1 (DC Comics)

DC, looking ahead to the sunny and joyous release day of the long-awaited Wonder Woman 1984 movie, has released a comic book tie-in. “WW84”, issue #1, the ‘Exclusive Movie Tie-In!’ […]

DC, looking ahead to the sunny and joyous release day of the long-awaited Wonder Woman 1984 movie, has released a comic book tie-in. “WW84”, issue #1, the ‘Exclusive Movie Tie-In!’ hits stores this week.

The main story, Museum Madness, runs a quick 16 pages and is written by Anna Obropta and Louise Simonson. Diana Prince, guiding a group of teens through a museum exhibit about Viking Warriors, is interrupted by thieves, who want to make off with museum valuables. It’s up to Diana to slip away, so Wonder Woman can try to foil the museum bandits and free the hostages.

The story is a clean, uncomplicated ‘done-in-one’, where Wonder Woman and Diana interact with the teens and act as role models. It doesn’t offer crossover to other titles, doesn’t continue, and no other maneuvering takes place to usher new readers to additional material. I have mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, it’s refreshing to read a story that is simply a story, with a beginning, middle, and end. But perhaps there could have been a reference to a similar Wonder Woman all-ages book, to encourage a new reader to explore the character.

Bret Blevins contributes interior artwork, rendering a healthy and positive Wonder Woman, and a modestly attired Diana Prince. The teens and crooks are well-illustrated, and there is plenty of eye-pleasing action to enjoy. Great darks and lights, and wonderful figures in movement. Steve Buccellato’s colours are fresh, well balanced for skin tones, and uncomplicated.

The backup story is not included in the review material provided but is written by Steve Pugh and illustrated by French/Canadian artist Marguerite Sauvage. There is a variant cover available that is illustrated by Robin Eisenberg.

DC, WW84 #1, $3.99, page count not available. For ages 13+

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!