Comic Review: Batman #24 (DC Comics)

Batman and Gotham Girl have a talk. It’s a discussion of wants and needs, a discussion about why anyone does what they do within the superhero business in the first […]

Batman and Gotham Girl have a talk. It’s a discussion of wants and needs, a discussion about why anyone does what they do within the superhero business in the first place.

While Batman asks the questions, Gotham Girl asks the same questions. What does Batman want? What does Batman need? Why is he still pursuing this lifestyle? Will he ever find what he’s looking for in life and be content?

If it hasn’t been obvious thus far within King’s Batman run, his character study of Batman is by far the most human, introspective view of the character ever written by far. He’s not the mythological figure that Scott Snyder has symbolized, he’s not this extremely kept together individual like Jeph Loeb’s Batman. This is a Batman Who is more mentally fragile. Yes, he comes up with plans and is able to combat problems physically and strategically head on, but his biggest battles that is touched upon here and there by different writers are explored more by King within his run and especially within this issue. Seeing Batman thinking about his actual wants and needs, having a desire for a life where he can share it with someone he loves is nice to see. Batman is always this solo guy, but even he can’t always fight his battles in dark places and come out unscathed of the natural human desire of companionship and a form of normalcy. It’s a good attempt at further examining Batman as an individual and seeing what makes him tick. Admittedly, it is a bit odd to see Batman trying to settle down in some degree given the kind of lifestyle that he lives. The dialogue at times can be somewhat all over the place at times and sometimes doesn’t always sync well with the art on the page. The question is: Can a guy such as Batman ever, truly be happy? Not really. But should he be denied of some kind of happiness, not at all.

David Finch’s art is consistently good, but the art that really steals the show in terms of creativity and style is Clay Mann. With the assistance of Seth Mann, Clay Mann’s art is majestic to look at it. There are some standout pages that are focused on Gotham Girl and Batman talking on top of a skyscraper throughout most of the issue. But the way Mann sets up the panel and page layouts is what really make this issue stand out. His artwork is beautifully executed and truly makes the conversation between Batman and Gotham Girl more engaging than it initially reads.

Batman #24 is an introspective, quiet issue that is more focused on Batman internalizing his own life and mortality than fighting bad guys. It’s a worthwhile issue to read, and a nice break from big storylines that’ll exhaust readers. Definitely, check it out.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

About Anthony Andujar Jr.