Comic Review: Ghost Tree #2 (IDW)

With the second issue of Ghost Tree, from IDW, we resume the story of, well, a Ghost Tree, where ghosts hang around. But that’s not giving proper credit for conceptual […]

With the second issue of Ghost Tree, from IDW, we resume the story of, well, a Ghost Tree, where ghosts hang around. But that’s not giving proper credit for conceptual development.

Written by Bobby Curnow, with art by Simon Gane and colours by Ian Herring and Becka Kinzie, Ghost Tree digs deeply into Japanese culture, family roots (no pun intended) and thoughts about life and death. It’s deep stuff.

Our lead character, Brandt has returned to his home village. He finds he can talk to the dead. Brandt discovers more about his family and has a surprise visit from someone in his past. Meanwhile, a dangerous spirit starts to hang around the Tree, making things truly frightening.

Ghost Tree is drawn in perhaps might be best described as ‘indie style’, an individualistic art style courtesy of Simon Kane. Kane is able to show restrained movement of characters really well and keeps to an unadorned line treatment. The drawings are done with obvious care and attention. The colouring is in basic shades of green and red, mostly, leading to a feeling of ‘forest in danger’.

Fascinating topic and well handled. Give it a try!

IDW, Ghost Tree #2, $3.99 for 25 pages of content. Assume Teen

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!