Comic Review: Plate Tectonics: An Illustrated Memoir (BOOM! Studios)

BOOM! Studios release an Illustrated biography and memoir of a graphic novel of Plate Tectonics: An Illustrated Memoir of Margaux Motin. This graphic novel is going to become a turn […]

BOOM! Studios release an Illustrated biography and memoir of a graphic novel of Plate Tectonics: An Illustrated Memoir of Margaux Motin.

This graphic novel is going to become a turn of events, but this time the whole story will bring out as a memoir which focuses on a simple cartoonist who was divorced and raised her own daughter by herself. Now, everyone has their story of their own, even as their experiences as cartoonists, but apart from that, this story focuses on having like expectations and reality kind of thing, but instead, it’s “coupled and divorced.” If you don’t know who’s Margaux Motin, well she’s a French Illustrator and a blogger who claimed to be the best bookseller in France by selling over 80,000 copies of her first published book of “But I really wanted to be an Anthropologist”. But this graphic novel tells the story about how her life has changed not just a cartoonist, but in life as an adult.

Ok, on the front cover it shows the illustrated version of Margaux Motin, drawing herself as if she’s making tattoos all by herself, half-naked. Yeah, I’m not trying to be vulgar, but what does this look like? She actually started to pose herself while painting something creative with her body and let’s put up the point that this is a memoir, because I had to double-check and that’s actually Margaux Motin herself, otherwise this nothing to do with her and the story. There’s not much to say that about the story because it’s all about a genre of a slice of life. As if Margaux is trying to reminisce her life when she was still young and her husband is away, and she had to take care of her own daughter. But there are some other hilarious moments that make that character seem to be more immature. She actually drinks wine, gets lazy, and probably the most embarrassing moment that you’ll ever see her image.

The art is actually well-fitting for an illustrator because most of the drawings that I’ve seen are mostly women illustrators who basically illustrate fashion and all, but the funny thing about these illustrators is that they tend to make their business even for a career. This art is like you’re making a meme out of it, but it’s not that bad, I think it’s more modern for a french cartoonist because there is more art than meets the eye. Oh and you gotta love the lettering, instead of the comic lettering, she actually tends to have such skill of writing as calligraphy or cursive writing. The composition is great, even in this comic, because instead of panels, we get some of the craziest kind of story that you can follow. However, making a story of a memoir of a French cartoonist may seem to be overkill, but this is like taking you to a memory lane of your favorite illustrator, and that’s where this book drops the bomb. If you rather want to follow the story of your favorite French author and cartoonist, then this is for you.

About Kevin Bermeo

I'm a New Yorker Artist, and I traveled a lot. I enjoy making comics, illustrations, paintings, and digital art. Besides drawing, I'm also a writer, I used to be a Gamer, and I love adventures, food, and dragons.