Comic Review: The Butcher of Paris #2 (Dark Horse Comics)

The second issue of The Butcher of Paris, from Dark Horse, continues to bring horror and history to our disbelieving eyes. We need to believe it, though, because writer Stephanie […]

The second issue of The Butcher of Paris, from Dark Horse, continues to bring horror and history to our disbelieving eyes.

We need to believe it, though, because writer Stephanie Phillips is starting with a true story: a Jew in Paris is a sociopath and serial killer of fellow Jews who are attempting to escape Nazi rule.

It’s 1945, in Nazi-occupied Paris. It’s late in World War 2, and Police Detective Georges-Vistor Massu and his son Bernard are investigating these brutal dismemberments.

The Butcher of Paris is not just all about blood and bones, of course. There are some really effectively captured moments in this issue; without spoiling the experience, I can highlight a few themes that are well treated by Phillips… the discovery of bodies in unlikely places, the insistence of the Nazi officials that they are present at autopsies and thoroughly briefed; what the officers do in their free time, and so on. The more mundane and calm moments help to magnify the horror when it’s brought forth.

Dean Kotz on art and Jason Wordie on colour really bring us the feel of World War II France. Wordie uses a vibrant colour palette and alternating between romantic idyllic hues to stark visions of insanity. Kotz manages to portray complicated scenes with figures, backgrounds, and subtext in a seemingly casual way. It looks effortless and reads easy. This is NOT easy to do. I like the ink style that Kotz works with here; it ‘reads’ 1940s, and has an economy of line that captures nuance with power.

Great Read! Enough said… now for the long wait until issue 3 is released (Feb 5)!

Dark Horse, The Butcher Of Paris #2, $3.99 for 22 pages of content. Assume Mature readers

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!