Comic Review: Detective Comics # 951 (DC Comics)

“ Their eyes Batman, what’s wrong with their eyes?” Main title writer Tynion lV and artist Christian Duce kick off the first chapter of The League of Shadows arc and […]

“ Their eyes Batman, what’s wrong with their eyes?”

Main title writer Tynion lV and artist Christian Duce kick off the first chapter of The League of Shadows arc and boy the Bat Family appear to be in way over their heads. It’s been very quiet in Gotham City for the past few weeks, crime has lowered, and things seem calm. The Bat Family continue to practice their combat and the work skills in the mud room. Everything seems fine, or so it seems. Batwoman’s father warns Batman that the League of Shadows have arrived in Gotham in plain sight. What are the league’s plans for Gotham City? Why are they attacking Gotham? Are they looking for something, or specifically someone?

Tynion really kicks off this arc like a rising tide ready to make its first crash to shore. He manages to set the perfect atmosphere and narrative structure that makes this first chapter strong in its foundation and execution. What’s really great is how he displays the Bat Family’s individual personalities and chemistry, especially when displaying a conversation between Batman and Batwoman concerning Cassandra. There is a sense of believability that these people aren’t just brooding individuals that stalk the night. They feel real, especially in regards to making humorous remarks in a way that is fittingly well with the characters and story. The build up to the conclusion of the issue is actually (or at least felt to me) really smooth. Tynion knows what he’s doing with the characters and this title. Lady Shiva is displayed in the most brutally ruthless style than previous iterations. The torture she puts individuals through felt as brutal as it reads brutal.

Christian Duce’s art keeps the quality of this title in terms of visual narrative and stands up there with the other roundtable of artists on this title in terms of the visual language that it provides the readers. Seeing a two-page splash of the Bat Family in the mud took facing off against pre-programmed, kung fu versions of Oswald Cobblepot (The Penguin) is as hilarious as it was visually cool. Alex Sinclair’s colors are pretty strong in this book and the rest of the team on this title in all equal efforts do the same. Tynion and company have yet to disappoint on this title. This is most definitely a primary Batman book that really aims to answer some questions since rebirth. Nonetheless, add this to your pull list.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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