Comic Review: Justice League of America #8 (DC Comics)

While on the trail of the evil organization known as S.K.U.L.L, the Justice League of America are lead to Monster Valley. The JLA cross paths with a survivor named Markson, […]

While on the trail of the evil organization known as S.K.U.L.L, the Justice League of America are lead to Monster Valley.

The JLA cross paths with a survivor named Markson, who has survived has the harsh conditions of Monster Valley since the age of 3. The JLA have reintroduced him back to civilization, causing media attraction due to his testimony, but Batman and Black Canary are skeptical of his backstory and his intent. What is Markson truly hiding from The JLA along with the rest of the world? Is Markson truly what he says he is, or is there something far more sinister lurking underneath?

This was a surprisingly well-written issue that keeps the reader guessing the motives or the reasons as to why Markson is suddenly reintegrating in society. Obviously, in most stories, the cliche of skepticism and motivation of an unknown character is always occurrent but it’s the execution, delivery, motivation and why that makes it thrilling to actually read. Steve Orlando is writing a very tight story about the JLA and their difficulties of having to build trust among one another. Despite Batman’s whole slogan of having human members as more trustworthy than members who are not (although it’s an ironic theme that plays throughout the book). The story leaves you guessing and scratching your head as to why The League doesn’t trust Markson and provides a good reason why near the end. What’s enjoyable in the book is seeing Lobo, Black Canary, The Atom and Killer Frost call Batman out on his B.S at times. It’s nice to see that Batman has to keep on his toes and have to do more than use his stoic posture to convince his teammates to trust him. It’s still interesting seeing the media as a plot device, constantly questioning the validity of The JLA’s initiative of connecting and rehabilitating people etc.

Felipe Watanabe’s art is strong in this issue. His placement of scenes and letting them unravel as the pages turn leave more to be desired. In a good way. There aren’t much complaints with his art since every character feels appropriately drawn and individualized in appearance. The inks by Hannah are also good making the book feel like a complete package. Thanks, colors by Hi-Fi also give the visual art a leg up.

This is a more well-paced issue than some of the issues prior. And so far, this is a more solid Justice League series than the others that are out thus far. Give it a read, you just might enjoy it.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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