Comic Review: Wonder Woman #758 (DC Comics)

Ever wonder if you’ve dropped into a comic series at the wrong issue? It’s a bit like joining a New Year’s Eve Party at 11:55 while sober. Everyone is already […]

Ever wonder if you’ve dropped into a comic series at the wrong issue?

It’s a bit like joining a New Year’s Eve Party at 11:55 while sober. Everyone is already fed, watered, and in full gear. The place is a bit disorganized and no one even notices you. Such is the feeling with DC’s Wonder Woman #758 when I popped by for a look. Things were rocking, and I didn’t know most of the people there.

The cover(s) are simply astonishing, first off. Wonder Woman is seen with the Phantom Stranger in the principle cover by Robson Rocha, Daniel Henriques, and Romulo Fajardo Jr. And the variant by Jeff Dekel is a subdued, shadowed masterpiece. Can’t go wrong with either start.

Anyway, this issue is all about Wonder Woman and The Phantom Stranger, arguing about a woman who has done wrong. They cuss, they disagree, get angry, and all kinds of things. They say stuff they don’t mean, they stomp around and raise the roof. Well, it’s outdoors, but you know what I mean. It’s Steve Orlando on the script, bringing this arc to a sense of closure. Emanuela Lupacchino pencils, Ray McCarthy inks, and Romulo Fajardo Jr colours. It’s strong of visual, great poses, heavy moody dramatic colours, and effects. Fireworks, streamers, canapes-a-poppin’!

It’s flames, it’s a lasso, it’s a flaming lasso. But will things in Themyscira go back to normal? We’ll just have to wait until the dust settles, the champagne corks get swept away, and Auld Lang Syne fades.

Sometimes we turn the page, and sometimes we just “Wonder” if we are in for different kind of normal going forward, know what I mean?

DC Wonder Woman #758, $3.99 for 21 pages of content. Teen

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!