Comic Review: Vampirella Roses for the Dead #1 (Dynamite)

Just in time for Vampirella’s 50th anniversary, writer Kristina Deak-Linsner and artist Joseph Michael Linsner team up to create issue 1 of Vampirella: Roses For The Dead, for Dynamite. Vampirella, […]

Just in time for Vampirella’s 50th anniversary, writer Kristina Deak-Linsner and artist Joseph Michael Linsner team up to create issue 1 of Vampirella: Roses For The Dead, for Dynamite.

Vampirella, the scantily clad vampire, is in the city. But first, a witch by the name of Evily, is in a hospital, checking in on a friend. She’s wearing a tight-fitting cape ensemble and a large satanic circle necklace. She’s set up a spooky altar in the hospital room, complete with lit candles. The nurse is not alarmed.
Later, when Evily and Vampirella bump into each other later at a dive bar, things really get weird. It’s like an offbeat version of Betty and Veronica, where they are both chasing an evil Archie!

This is light-hearted fare, verging on parody, but it’s a fun read. It’s just two chatty occult friends hanging around in the deserted streets of Philadelphia. (One whose skirt keeps falling off!) Both dark ladies are quick to pair up to work together to rid the city of undesirables, leading us to the abrupt end of the first issue. Hmm, did NOT see THAT coming!

Kristina Deak-Linsner’s story is straightforward enough, and Joseph Michael Linsner’s art verges from cartoony (à la Archie) to a line style reminiscent of war comic artist Russ Heath. Detailed, with well-drafted figures and faces. Good colouring by Ceci De La Cruz.

I’m not a regular Vampirella reader, so I can’t compare this title to other Vampirella offerings, but this might appeal to readers who like a bit of ‘lightly-dark’ occult adventure.

Dynamite, Vampirella: Roses For The Dead #1 (of 4) $3.99 for 24 pages of content. Teen +

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!