Comic Review: Gideon Falls: Director’s Cut #1 (Image)

Issue 1 of Gideon Falls, the new series from Image, has been re-released as a Director’s Cut. A Director’s Cut, in comics, is different from a Director’s Cut in film. […]

Issue 1 of Gideon Falls, the new series from Image, has been re-released as a Director’s Cut.

A Director’s Cut, in comics, is different from a Director’s Cut in film. In film, the director’s preferred edit of the entire movie is assembled. This can vary quite a bit from the official studio release: different takes, more footage, plot changes and so on. It’s the Director’s vision of the story without the studio executives adding their input.

In comics, as we know, ‘Director’s Cut’ refers to a black and white reprint of the comic, usually with a rough script, or working sketches and so on added in as extras. More of a ‘behind the scenes’ look at the same material.

And so it is with Gideon Falls. Unfortunately, this title’s Director’s Cut is not as compelling as say, an issue of Batman that shows Jim Lee original pencils. In this case, Andrea Sorrentino’s work is simply black and white, without the benefit of colour. Occasionally some dialogue will be coloured in a word balloon, but really, you are looking at black line work, with very interesting scratchy marks on it. Lots of black areas, and high contrast illustrations. All really fine, but you know, I liked the colour and miss it!

Bonus pages include a version of the script, which looks ‘prepared for print’, in other words, there are no coffee stains or highlighter marks on the pages, just typeset columns of text.

You can see where I’m going with this; I’d have liked to have seen pencil roughs, edits, redrawn panels, script ideas, that sort of thing.

Image, Gideon Falls #1, Director’s Cut. $4.99 for 40 pages. Rated Mature

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!