Comic Review: Naomi #2 (DC Comics)

Naomi, a new title from DC Comics’ “Wonder Comics’ imprint, heads closer to revealing the Truth in issue 2. Naomi, a young teen, is adopted. She is fascinated with Superman, […]

Naomi, a new title from DC Comics’ “Wonder Comics’ imprint, heads closer to revealing the Truth in issue 2.

Naomi, a young teen, is adopted. She is fascinated with Superman, just like the rest of us. But when she starts to unravel the mystery of her birth parents, things start to get, well, weird. Now she’s chasing a lead that seems promising. It revolves around a local car mechanic who gets nervous when Naomi starts to ask him questions. What’s up with that?

The ‘origin’ of Naomi is a good topic for a story. After all, we all want to know where we came from.

Writers Brian Michael Bendis and David F. Walker certainly work the material. They manage to wring every possible emotional moment out of Naomi’s situation. But it’s a bit much sometimes, especially during some of the elongated scenes; the sharing and caring threaten to cross the dramatic river into comic parody. It’s a fine balance, and it frequently tips toward ‘overdone’.

And the scenes are indeed overly long and drawn out. One simple ‘break and enter’ sequence lasts five pages!

But our hearts yearn for closure for Naomi, who has stolen our sympathies. The artwork and colouring are nicely handled by Jamal Campbell, with just the right amount of drama to be believable.

Plus, there is the occasional splash page of Superman, hard at work. It’s drawn and coloured in such an explosive fashion. But the connection between Naomi and Superman is so tenuous that Superman himself might wonder why he’s included in this story of a young teen girl looking for her parents. Or is this foreshadowing???

DC Comics, Naomi #2, $3.99 for 19 pages of content. Not rated, assume Teen

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!