Comic Review: Black Terror #1 (Dynamite Entertainment)

This is my first time reading Black Terror as a character and I have to say, for an introduction, Max Bemis does a fantastic job of providing a perfect set […]

This is my first time reading Black Terror as a character and I have to say, for an introduction, Max Bemis does a fantastic job of providing a perfect set up for the character and his current state in the world.

It’s interesting that many of the Dynamite characters that I’ve come across in passing have only been characters that I would remember seeing due to the wonderful cover art that is often provided by Alex Ross. But this new series caught my interest, maybe it was due to the fact that I wanted to have a different fix that wasn’t of the usual Marvel and DC norm, or maybe it’s just that the writing was so good that I had to stay with the book all the way to the end?

The premise focuses on Bob Benton, AKA the legendary WW2 superhero Black Terror, who is currently undergoing a personal crisis, as he deals with all kinds of depression, and personal issues that have plagued him through his long life. Despite his superheroic past, and his abilities, that is not what entices me to read this book all the way through. What caught my attention is the story of Bob, and how he handles dealing with his issues.

It’s fascinating to see Max Bemis develop and grow in his craft, especially from where he started in one career into his current one. Bemis manages to tell a very relatable story with a character that easily has a larger than life story that most would feel detached from. Yet he manages to provide a sense of gravity and heart to Bob as he tries to figure out his purpose in the modern-day and age (despite this being based in this 70s). But it’s the story of a character just trying to figure out why he does what he does, and whether or not it is an addiction that gives him purpose. Now despite the subtle commentary that is relevant to the difficulties that people face today in regards to economic divide and such, there is much more to the story that is more than enough to peak one’s interest.

The artwork by Gaudio and colorwork by Brittany Pezzillo is fantastic. Where the art is at its most powerful is in the interactions between Bob and Sheila. The lettering by Esposito is actually the first thing that caught my eye, as it made it easy to read this book without feeling the need to withdraw from it to read something else. With the art, colors, and lettering as a trinity, I’d say the art team delivers with this first issue. I’m curious to see where Bemis takes this character and this series because while it is based in the 1970s, I wonder how he would depict Black Terror in modern settings? Either way, this was a really delightful read and I recommend picking this issue up for new comic book day.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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