Comic Review: Green Lantern #1 (DC Comics)

It’s a new era for the Green Lantern title as the book returns with a new series centered on the legendary Green Lantern, John Stewart. The United Planets have gathered […]

It’s a new era for the Green Lantern title as the book returns with a new series centered on the legendary Green Lantern, John Stewart. The United Planets have gathered to dictate who will be more suited for protecting the cosmos.

This leaves the Guardians of the Universe and Oa in a difficult position should they lose their ability as the primary protectors of the universe. With a universal paradigm shift, what will become of the Green Lantern Corps? And how will John Stewart and his crew navigate this ever-changing landscape?

When Geoffrey Thorne was announced as the writer of this title, he gained a lot of attention. Whether that helped the book doesn’t matter because right off the bat, Thorne shows that he is a worthy writer on Green Lantern. When it comes to Green Lantern, Hal Jordan has been the headliner that’s always at the forefront. But over the last twenty years, many identify and yearn for John Stewart to headline a series where he can be at center stage. And while he’s had his moments in the spotlight, it usually always dimmed faster than it shined, until now.

Thorne kicks off the book with a bang, displaying the current state quo of the corps and Stewart. He plays around with some interesting concepts in regards to the guardians and their place in the universe. For so long they’ve often supervised the universe, but now for the first time, they’ll have a planetary committee supervise them. It’s a fascinating concept that hasn’t been toyed with, and the choices that Thorne makes an engrossing story worth a reader’s attention.

Personally, I really enjoyed Thorne’s handling of John Stewart and his relationships with his fellow lanterns such as Keli and Simon Baz. Each of the characters are endearing, with different personalities that feel more like a family than an actual team. And that is a good thing. Oftentimes, the lanterns have always been displayed as comrades in arms, but Thorne gives the lanterns a familial approach that feels more personable and worthwhile to follow. The conflicts that occur within the story in regards to the place of the Guardians, the resistance towards them and the necessities of them shows promise for what Thorne aims to deliver going forward with the series.

In regards to the artwork, Dexter Soy was a perfect choice to kick-start the book. He does a fantastic job providing action with his layouts, giving the book a scale fitting of a summer blockbuster. While Soy does his job in that arena, Marco Santucci delivers in making the courtroom scenes of the United Planets as captivating as the action that both he and Soy deliver. And with Alex Sinclair on color duties and Rob Leigh’s lettering, it truly is the cherry on top of this emerald cake of a book. If you’re a fan of John Stewart, Justice League Unlimited, or the Green Lanterns, but have been out of touch or looking for a good time to jump in, this book is a great place to start! I highly recommend adding this to your pull list this week.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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