Comic Review: Locust #1 (Scout Comics)

There is a new virus, and things get worse in a hurry in Locust #1, from Scout Comics. Fishermen coming home on their boat, two years ago. They’re heading into […]

There is a new virus, and things get worse in a hurry in Locust #1, from Scout Comics.

Fishermen coming home on their boat, two years ago. They’re heading into the New York City area from a long trip offshore. Their radio tells them that their families are not safe. There is a new West African virus spreading quickly around the world. It’s the ‘catch of the day.’

Well, that sounds too familiar to all of us during this Covid pandemic of course. But as we switch to the present, we see that the dead of winter has arrived. The issue’s cover image of the Manhattan Bridge as seen from Dumbo Brooklyn’s Washington and Water Streets is deserted and snow-packed.

It seems that the virus is changing people into zombie-like full-sized locust monsters. At least it looks that way. And things are scarce and there are mad dogs everywhere. And people with guns. Post-apocalyptic without the usual hints and allegations.

Spanish writer Massimo Rosi and artist Alex Nieto create this strained new world. It’s dark, grey, brown, and growling all over. The concept is an apt one, of course; pandemics are the flavour of the year(s). But the narrative is confusing, and we are not being given enough bread crumbs or a snow shovel with which to navigate the terrain. So we take baby steps and speculate. Figure it out for ourselves; friend or foe, etc.

Without spoiling the contents of the package, there are story issues. The dramatic potential is unlimited, but the reading is slippery and snow-packed. We think that we are watching these same fishermen trying to survive a post-infection world. But are we? We think that civilization is at risk of collapse. But how did that happen? We think that friends are turning on friends. But we’re not sure.

Nieto’s artwork is strong here, loads of big shapes, shadows, and visual drama. The lines are thick and graphic, the intention is to create tension, and the viewpoints and figures are well executed. (Lettering is by Mattia Gentile) But we need narrative help, the way is cloudy, we have no clue, no map to guide us to safety. Is help on the way? Let’s hope so. This is issue one of eight.

Scout Comics, Locust #1, $3.99 for 28 pages of content.

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!