Comic Review: Static #2: Season One (DC Comics)

Just when things for Virgil Hawkins were getting bad, high school adversary Hotstreak promises to make things worse! And indeed he does as Hotstreak knows where Virgil’s family lives, and […]

Just when things for Virgil Hawkins were getting bad, high school adversary Hotstreak promises to make things worse!

And indeed he does as Hotstreak knows where Virgil’s family lives, and threatens the lives of his loved ones, Virgil is going to learn that power always comes with a price.

After the first issue, I had wondered whether Static would continue to keep his powers under wraps given how out in the open he is with his abilities. But Ayla and the rest of the team on this book continue to throw curveballs as to where Static/Virgil Hawkins is going along with the rest of his side of the world. It’s one thing to deal with up-and-coming supervillains, but it’s another thing to have to deal with the revelations made by family and witnesses that knows one’s secret. How does someone with that kind of power deal with it being (almost) public knowledge amongst friends and family? This approach to Static is very appropriate to the world we live in today, where information is shared and under surveillance no matter where you go, via on the street or cell phone.

What’s most interesting about this issue and this series thus far is that Ayala continues to chart new territory that hasn’t been done in any iteration of Static, where readers are exposed to characters that they know but are also seeing these characters in a new light. What makes this issue great is that Static’s family has a more prominent role than any iteration of Static prior. From the conversations to the chemistry, each member of the family feels like real people who are approaching these circumstances in the same way as families and individuals in the real world would. Discussions such as the advantages of having abilities that could help one get ahead in life, whether it defines or gives one value, in addition to understanding one’s social status within society and how all of these things trickle down, affect Virgil in profound ways. It makes for a compelling read that anyone could relate to. The story is great and promises more to offer in regards to the looming threats that lie ahead for Static. Ayala not only develops the world of Static but also establishes Static’s place within the world of Milestone in really clever ways.

In regards to the art, Chris Cross provided layouts while Nikolas Draper-Ivey does all of the redesigns, linework, and color finishes. The art continues to be spectacular. It’s full of life and vibrant movement and maintains if not, progresses more and more into a great-looking book. It would be no surprise if there was an anime film or anime adaptation of this series because the art delivered by Ivey is cinematically beautiful to look at. Andsworld Design does a great job lettering this entire book, weaving the writing and art together in unison, providing a smooth reading experience. It’s safe to say that the momentum from the previous issue isn’t letting up and Static’s rise to becoming a hero has only just begun, and just when you think the tension will let up, Ayala and team apply more pressure on our electrifying hero. I highly recommend picking this issue up for new comic book day!

Anthony Andujar Jr.

About Anthony Andujar Jr.