Comic Review: Impossible Jones #1 (Scout Comics)

Impossible Jones #1 from Scout Comics introduces a true ‘anti-hero’, a young criminal who gets powers and is mistaken for a superhero. It’s written (and inked!) by Karl Kesel (Harley […]

Impossible Jones #1 from Scout Comics introduces a true ‘anti-hero’, a young criminal who gets powers and is mistaken for a superhero.

It’s written (and inked!) by Karl Kesel (Harley Quinn etc), pencils are by David Hahn (Batman ’66 etc), colours by Tony Avina.

First, then, the really great things about Impossible Jones: #1; The art is amaaaazing. The gestures, the angles, the character movements, the expressions, the everything. The colouring, the lettering, (Comicraft) so rich and gorgeous. #2; And the sheer complexity of the plot, with its witty dialogue, the retro references, the plays on words, and #3; Kesel’s ability to meld and bend story elements into something quite unique.

But unfortunately, it’s not all good news. The issue is a confusing affair. Reading it is like hanging on to a bucking bronco. Plot points get buried in cleverness. Who is the hero and who is the criminal? We misunderstand what is happening, get thrown off the horse, and need to dust ourselves off. There are flashbacks within flashbacks. There are tiny characters shown in tiny panels who we are supposed to notice as we sort out the plot. There are subplots that interfere with our following the main story. Characters pop in for a quick cameo, and we don’t know if they are significant or not. Woe by to the reader; this book needs unraveling and reorganization to see its full potential.

There is hope. Maybe in issue two, now that the cast has been formally introduced, we will see a forward motion, a sequential storytelling arc that we can sink our ‘parody-loving’ teeth into!

Scout Comics, Impossible Jones #1, $3.99 for 30 pages of story content. Advisory rating

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!