Comic Review: Crossover #9 (Image Comics)

Ellie (Ellipses) and Ryan are apprehended and interrogated as comic book writers are still being skated by mysterious forces. As their innocence is put into question, Ellie and Ryan must […]

Ellie (Ellipses) and Ryan are apprehended and interrogated as comic book writers are still being skated by mysterious forces. As their innocence is put into question, Ellie and Ryan must uncover the mystery of the assailants behind these murders and the events that affect existence itself. What secrets will be uncovered?

There’s something fun about Donny Cates’s writing that makes this series entertaining and more enjoyable than his mainstream work. While on the surface this book is something that could be enjoyed by new and casual readers of comics, it is more appreciated by fans of the comics medium and publishers that make it. This issue might be the more Grant Morrison-Esque issue for all of its meta-commentary on the medium and comics themselves more so than previous issues. That most likely will continue to be a thing which is very much welcomed. The story is great, giving readers time to catch up on recent events and follow the current state of Ellipses and Ryan’s circumstances after being apprehended.

The writing is fun and witty, characters crack jokes, characters make surprising appearances, mysteries deepen and twists continue, providing a reading experience that’s worth investing in as events unfold. There are some great moments between Ellipses and a classic set of image characters that is cleverly hilarious for those within the know of these characters, while also an educational nod for those that know very little about such characters or the writing tropes of the very characters that were made by them.

In regards to the art, Geoff Shaw has remained consistent with his visual storytelling abilities, delivering beautiful art and layouts. The most enjoyable part about Shaw’s illustrations and line work is all of the Easter eggs/deep cuts within comics beyond the big two, and his rendering of the pantheon of various characters within the medium. It provides the reader some time to pause and play Where’s Waldo with all of the appearances that are simultaneously obvious yet subtle for fans of the medium. While Shaw’s layouts are great, it’s Cunniffe’s color work that really breathes life into the linework, making the book all the more beautiful when accompanied by John J.Hill’s lettering.

It’s easy to say that this is definitely a great pick-up for anyone that loves the medium such as comics. The story is great for anyone, providing a rollercoaster ride of a mystery that keeps readers wondering what will happen next. Fun writing, great art, it’s one of the most enjoyable books being published by Image and one of the most fun comics out there in general. I definitely recommend adding this book to your pull list for new comic book day.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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