Comic Review: Robin #9 (DC Comics)

As the League of Lazarus tournament comes to a close, the true motivations of the tournament have been revealed! A demon rises from the pits to claim the soul of […]

As the League of Lazarus tournament comes to a close, the true motivations of the tournament have been revealed!

A demon rises from the pits to claim the soul of the best fighter, Connor Hawke! Being one of the few fighters left standing, Damian will have to muster all the strength, skills, and will to defeat this demon or it will be his last time on earth!

It’s interesting when considering the kind of experience that Damian has had as a character throughout his publication run. From the moment Morrison and company birthed the character, Damian has always been a character full of potential, and given that he’s had such a family lineage, it’s surprising that it’s never explored as much. Thankfully, Williamson has been contributing more to Damian’s own mythos, not only as Robin but as a descendant of the Al Gual’s. In the last few years Damian has become more selfless and has had some considerable character development, but this particular run that Williamson has been writing has given him more personality than he’s ever had. Whether it’s him battling against his grandmother’s Mortal Kombat-esque demon of a final boss or having a heart-to-heart with a loved one from his past, Damian is certainly growing into his own.

The writing for this issue is action-packed, fast-paced, and fun. There are some nice moments that remind readers why this book has been consistently enjoyable since the first issue. There are some fun character moments and some surprises that leave the reader in an unexpected place by the end of the issue. There wasn’t a moment when reading this book that felt boring, or annoying, and that’s something that readers should be thankful for. These days when it comes to writing comics, especially within the superhero genre, it’s oftentimes drenched with being too self-absorbed in its own drama, trying to be serious when it forgets the genre that it is. Which makes this enjoyable to jump right in and read a book that reminds readers about the fun there is within superhero comics when written well with fun characters and personalities that leave you interested in the direction that they head long after the issue is done

The art team on this book continues to deliver. Cruz’s linework is stylistically kinetic, combining eastern and western influences to create that nice sweet spot that could catch the attention of manga readers, superhero readers, and teens. Accompanied by Rapmund’s ink work, Guerrero’s fantastic color rendering, and Peteri’s lettering, they continue to craft an enjoyable title that’s different from its previous iterations and enjoyable in contrast to other books that are out by the same publisher and others. I highly recommend picking up this book and adding it to your pull list for new comic book day.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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