Comic Review: Step By Bloody Step #3 (Image Comics)

Time has passed and the girl grows into a woman, while her armored companion continues to do just as he always has for his friend. Much like all seasons, things […]

Time has passed and the girl grows into a woman, while her armored companion continues to do just as he always has for his friend. Much like all seasons, things change, and in all civilizations that contain seasons, so do cities.

In the midst of these changes, a King is seeking a woman worthy of his presence, and the woman of interest is the protagonist. What does he want with her? And what are his plans for her armored companion and the city?

It’s amazing how much of the writing is communicated through the art within this book. In the previous installments, Spurrier explored the adolescent years of the girl and her armored guardian, and throughout readers were witnesses to seeing this little girl and her armored companion grow up. This issue focuses on the two protagonists in their emerging adult years as they experience changes within themselves and their environment. If the previous two installments explored the conflicts of war and childhood, then this issue focuses very much on the impact of class and poverty, and how that shifts one’s perspective depending on the circumstances, sides, and lense of the conflict that they’re viewing from. Spurrier does a splendid job displaying the conflicts of perspective between the two protagonists as they witness events unfold in a heart-wrenching display that by the time you get to the end of the book, it’ll have readers speechless for what happens next.

Matias Bergara continues to display magnificent work with his visual storytelling as he continues to push the envelope with his storytelling abilities. From showcasing the two protagonists’ subtle and prevalent changes in personality and appearance to the action and silent moments that occur throughout the book, he only enhances the book that makes the whole experience of a silent comic worth reading. While Bergara’s linework is fantastic, Matheus Lopes’ colorwork, along with Jim Campbell’s glyphology work adds so much more to the book atmospherically that makes it a great reading experience. Emma Price continues to make this book cohesively consistent and beautifully designed with her graphic design work making this book one worth adding to your pull list for new comic book day.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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