Comic Review: We Have Demons #2 (Dark Horse Comics)

Lam begins her training with the Angels so that she could be ready for what her father has always intended for her. Secrets are uncovered that will change her perception […]

Lam begins her training with the Angels so that she could be ready for what her father has always intended for her. Secrets are uncovered that will change her perception of her father, Gus, and the entire Angel’s team. Is Lam ready for what is to come?

I think as a long-time reader of Scott Snyder’s work, it can be hit or miss in regards to how certain devices work, such as exposition/info dumps. I think it didn’t always work in his DC work, but for this particular series, it’s fitting to the kind of world and characters that inhabit this series. Lam is a witty character that is charming and likable for a protagonist who is thrusted into a world that is chaotic, and deadly. I think the most likable character for this issue that steals the show is Gus, due to his backstory and how he is connected to Lam in a significant way that makes sense and adds another layer to Lam’s otherworldly life and the story as a whole. The story itself in this chapter is more action-packed and dense than the previous issue, which will leave readers satisfied for a 48-page reading experience.

Greg Capullo’s art is in top form, filled with rich detail and sharpness that radiates all kinds of cool from page to page. I’m not sure what the deadline schedule must have been when Capullo was illustrating these pages, but they’re very satisfying to look at in regards to the action that ensues on certain pages. Some of that sharpness in Capullo’s linework is due to the strong ink work of Jonathan Glapion and the colorwork of Dave McCaig which might be the MVP for this series, adding more dimension and power to Capullo’s skillful linework. Tom Napolitano does a stellar job with the lettering on this book, especially when lettering the dialogue of the demons that Lam and her allies combat against. The demons have speech bubbles that really add an eeriness to their voices which is felt when reading the speech bubbles that they emit throughout certain action scenes.

While I wasn’t so big on the first issue (which had to do a lot of the groundwork with world-building), I really enjoyed the second issue that felt more focused in regards to story and direction. It’s safe to say that this is a book worth picking up and seeing where it goes.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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