Comic Review: Hitomi #4 (Image Comics)

Hitomi and Yasuke are at a crossroads. As war is on the horizon, the unit of two are split between decisions that dictate the course of their lives. And it […]

Hitomi and Yasuke are at a crossroads. As war is on the horizon, the unit of two are split between decisions that dictate the course of their lives. And it all hinges on Hitomi. Will she stay with Yasuke and continue her training? Or will she join the upcoming war that is right around the corner?

Writing: Witnessing the divergent paths that Hitomi and Yasuke embark on is heartbreaking. HS Tak does a fantastic job at showcasing the parental surrogate relationship between these two figures, who were once a family unit, have now drifted apart for their own respective reasons. Tak writes Hitomi and Yasuke’s journey brilliantly given the reasons are sound. Kids will do what they want to do, even if it’s against their best interests, and it’s displayed naturally in Hitomi’s journey of self, as she discovers what it’s like fighting in war. Even if it’s against the wishes of her mentor. On the surface, it’s a samurai book, but at its core, it’s a book about family, and what they’re willing to do for one another when the chips are down, which is what catches my attention as a comic. I wished I had checked this series out earlier on when it first started, but thankfully after catching up with it, I was left with excitement for what came next for Hitomi and Yasuke. By the time I got to issue 3 which was a very heavy issue, I knew I had to check out issue 4, which doesn’t make light of the consequences that spiraled out from the previous. The exploration of war, and what it does to children, and how those in power take advantage of it is thoughtfully displayed by Tak, making it a satisfying read.

Isabella Mazzanti consistently delivers by providing beautiful art that shines thanks to Nicolette Bea’s layouts. Both of the artists do a fantastic job at constructing scenes that are atmospheric, heartfelt, and action-packed. Valentina Napolitano accompanies the line work with beautiful color work that is full of earth tones, and textures which complement the rest of the art. Rob Jones’ letter work fits perfectly with the entire aesthetic and tone of the book, making this a gorgeously crafted comic. I was late to this series, but thankfully I’m caught up and can confirm that this is a well-crafted book full of depth, drama, and action. If you’re a fan of samurai stories or historical fiction, then the book might fit the bill for you. I recommend adding this to your pull list for new comic book day.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

About Anthony Andujar Jr.

Anthony Andujar Jr. is an NYC cartoonist and lover of comics and music. So much so that it led him to writing comic book reviews in between it all.