Comic Review: Superman #21 (DC Comics)

Superman, Superboy, and Robin (Damian) are in for more surprises in the second chapter of the Black Dawn Arc. Batman is missing, and it all has something to do with […]

Superman, Superboy, and Robin (Damian) are in for more surprises in the second chapter of the Black Dawn Arc.

Batman is missing, and it all has something to do with the strange substance that resides in the milk that Mr. Cobb’s farm produces. It seems there is much more to Me Cobb and his farm than what it seems. What is it that Mr. Cobb is doing? And what does it have to do with Superboy? What will that mean for the Superfamily as a whole? And what choices will Superboy make that’ll change him and the family forever?

Tomasi and Gleason continue to be the perfect match of a  writing duo made in heaven. The story is tight, straight to the point and fun to visually look at as it is to read it. Tomasi and Gleason continue to develop the character of Jon, and really cement the kinship between Jon and Robin (Damian) that feel consistent to the Super Son’s title that is also being written by these two. This issue really starts to get the gears grinding in regards to the small-town that the Super family resides in. There is a situation that happens that causes the townsfolk to challenge Superman’s own diplomatic way of handling things, being in favor of the way Superboy does things in terms of fending off threats in a somewhat lethal manner. It echoes elements of Joe Kelly’s What’s so Funny about Truth, Justice and the American Way? (Or as most people know this story due to its animation adaption, Superman Vs The Elite). It also reminds me a bit of Mark Waid’s Kingdom Come in regards to the themes between two generations, and the public in favor of more lethal methods over peaceful ones etc. There is a great conversation between Superman and Superboy that will definitely be a recurring theme for months to come. The twists are also organic and deliver in a way that isn’t for shock value and actually feels that it was naturally building up to this point in this series.

Gleason also contributes art duties and continues to deliver. Hopefully one day there could be a good animated adaption that portrays the kind of art style that Gleason has because it just fits so perfectly for animation. The art, the layouts, panels etc are all fantastic and maintains the graphic narrative of the story, keeping it intact with the story. Mick Gray, Joe Padro, and Ray McCarthy provide the inks and they render Gleason’s illustrations wonderfully and John Kalisz colors manage to do the same.

Tiffany, you have not been reading this title, you should. It’s one of the best titles and one of the most character defining runs of Superman in a really long time. This issue is an example of that. Definitely, go out and buy it, it won’t disappoint.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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