Comic Review: The Green Lantern #9 (DC Comics)

Somewhere across the universe, a gamma-irradiated being that possesses reality warping powers is ravaging the lives of an Antimatter mining colony.  Some of the universes best defenders known as Superwatch […]

Somewhere across the universe, a gamma-irradiated being that possesses reality warping powers is ravaging the lives of an Antimatter mining colony. 

Some of the universes best defenders known as Superwatch have fallen to the slaughter of this powerful being. The only way to stop this being is to call the Green Lantern Corps, but they are too far out of reach, so the only solution is to rely on the help of Hal Jordan, the Green Lantern!

This series has been very interesting and while each issue feels like a standalone one-shot tale that feels self-contained, it feels as though it is building up to something that I don’t think readers realize. Morrison has done a lot of set up before, especially in his highly regarded Batman run in which he laid the foundations for what became the modern standard for most Batman mythology, and I feel he is doing the same with this title. With that said, this issue was amazing from beginning to end! Morrison writes a tale that begins with cosmic proportions, segues seamlessly to a fantasy story, and manages to ramp things up to a crazy cliffhanger! I feel as though there are hints of Multiversity and Final Crisis in regards to what occurs within this issue and it’s perfectly executed. The story is bombastic, yet small for a good chunk of the issue, which begins to expand even more by the time readers get to the end of this issue. I’m excited to see what Morrison is going to do in the following issue as he kicks off this arc.

I think what makes this issue captivating is the relationship that Hal has with his power ring. The ring has its own personality, which is a lot different than what has been seen before from the likes of writers like Geoff Johns and Humphries. This a unique addition to Hal Jordan and to the story since he has a somewhat budding relationship with his power ring that feels reminiscent to the humorous Venom/Eddie Brock rapport that is seen at Marvel. The reveal of the primary antagonist that’s seen on the cover and in this issue is cleverly revealed that I couldn’t help but be amused at how Morisson takes the obvious and flips it on its head, making it an enjoyable moment that perfectly sets up what is to occur with what I believe is the first full-on arc of this series.

I feel that the art gets better with every issue, and this may be the very best that Liam Sharp’s art has been thus far! Although issue 7 is probably my favorite standalone issue, I feel that Sharpe has found strong footing throughout the duration of the title thus far, providing fantastic linework, and consistently eye warping layouts that are expertly executed and pleasing to the reader’s eyes. I think what stands out to me the most is Steve Oliff’s colors, I feel that this is the most vibrant that his coloring has been throughout the entirety of this series thus far. I feel that the color choices contrasted with Orzechowski’s letters and complemented Sharp’s pencils beautifully, accomplishing the otherworldly tone that Morrison and company have managed to establish for this series.

This series has been developing into an epic run that might surpass and reshape the mythology of Green Lantern in the following years to come. I highly recommend picking up this issue for new comic book day.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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