Comic Review: Green Lantern #5 (DC Comics)

As Green Lantern Jo Mullein investigates for evidence of those that caused the devastation of the Green Lantern Corps, John Stewart searches the sectors for the missing lanterns affected by […]

As Green Lantern Jo Mullein investigates for evidence of those that caused the devastation of the Green Lantern Corps, John Stewart searches the sectors for the missing lanterns affected by the destruction.

Meanwhile, Kid Lantern is alone facing off against The very ambassadors of fear, the Sinestro Corps. Will Jo and John discover the answers they seek? Will Kid Lantern survive her encounter long enough for her to see retirement?

While I enjoy the mystery that’s unfolding within this series in regards to the circumstances that the now fractured Green Lantern Corps, I’d like to focus on a particular character that stole the entire show in this issue. The character of topic that makes this whole issue worthwhile is Kid Lantern. I’ve often felt this character has often been underutilized since her inception, and I have since enjoyed her character within this series. As this series has progressed, I’ve taken a liking to her character, her backstory, and her presence within the (fractured) green lantern corps. So when I say this, I mean it, this was Kid Lantern’s time to shine and man does Geoffrey Thorne do an amazing job displaying the immense potential of this character. From the constructs that she crafts as she fends for herself in a divided sector, it’s refreshing to see the level of attention and development that Thorne effortlessly provides to make this character worth following.

To some degree, Thorne’s approach to Kid Lantern reminds me of how Tomasi, Gleason, and Jurgens approached Jon Kent when he was starting out. There is a charm to the character, and her motives as to why she does what she does really adds another layer to the ongoing mystery that plagues the remaining lanterns. Not only does Thorne write a compelling arc for Kid Lantern, but also does a great job at handling the Sinestro corps in a way that hasn’t been handled before in a subtle fashion. It’s refreshing to see the level of character development and mystery that Thorne is implementing into this series.

The art team on this book consisting of Tom Raney, Marco Santucci, and Andy McDonald, all do an amazing job on this issue. Their art and layouts, accompanied by Micheal Aytken’s colors and Rob Leigh’s lettering made for another exemplary installment. It’s surprising how good this issue was and how much nuance was added to a legacy character that could have easily been turned into a one-off. Thankfully that didn’t happen, and thankfully Geoffrey Thorne shows how much he cares for the characters within the story that he is telling. I look forward to the next issue, and I highly recommend adding this to your pull list for new comic book day.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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