Comic Review: Project Superpowers: Fractured States #2 (Dynamite Entertainment)

After awakening to the world of 2052, John Doe sees a fractured world, where the United States is broken, divided, and occupied by forces that aim to kill superheroes. With […]

After awakening to the world of 2052, John Doe sees a fractured world, where the United States is broken, divided, and occupied by forces that aim to kill superheroes.

With the help of the Black Terror troops, John Doe might have a chance to rediscover who he is and help restore the world to what it once was. But can he save himself from the clutches of the Clown and the mysterious forces that plague him?

Ron Marz and Andy Lanning continue crafting the world that John Doe inhabits, showing what has become of the United States and the heroes and villains that were once prominent within the world of Project Superheroes. Marz and Lanning’s approach to this iteration of The Clown (Ace) is cleverly handled in regards to how he came to be in this new world since the fall of the U.S. Readers gets a glimpse as to what occurred over the last few years since John Doe’s absence in addition to what has become of some parts of the world. The pacing of the story is smooth, and fast-paced enough that by the time you get to the end, readers won’t realize how fast they’ve read through the book until they get to the last page. What I enjoy most about this issue is there is a ton of show and don’t tell, which makes this book an enjoyable read.

Emilio Utera handles the art duties, providing action-packed linework that is entertaining to read throughout the book. His visual renditions of these golden age characters and the world that they inhabit is wonderfully handled, giving the book a beautiful blend of golden age and modern aesthetics that match the tone of this story. Arthur Hesli contributes colorwork that enhances Utera’s linework, providing a cinematic edge that is in keeping with the writing. Tom Napolitano does the lettering for the book and keeps the book tight and cohesive, ensuring that the story and visuals are in unison.

This issue is a solid follow-up to the first issue and is filled with more story and action that never drags. Between the world-building and action, the story is tight and enjoyable to read throughout. The mystery of how this world came to be in 2052 is inching closer and closer, and more details are revealed that is enough to garner interest and investment to purchase the next issue. Much like the first issue, I genuinely enjoyed reading this book and recommend it to anyone that’s looking to read comics that take classic golden age characters and reimagining them in new ways for new and old readers alike. Add his book to your pull list for new comic book day.

Anthony Andujar Jr.

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