Comic Review: Kroma #1 (Image Comics)

In Kroma #1, a new miniseries from Image, the dangerous world outside the gates is in full colour and must be avoided! In the Pale City, colour has been carefully […]

In Kroma #1, a new miniseries from Image, the dangerous world outside the gates is in full colour and must be avoided! In the Pale City, colour has been carefully removed, hidden. It’s a black-and-white world there inside the walls, for the protection of its citizens.

Oh, it sounds gimmicky and ludicrous, doesn’t it… the latest trope, preassembled and unpacked for a quick and easy worldbuild. The world of grey, and all that. But Italian creator Lorenzo De Felici (Oblivion Song) has created, written, and illustrated a remarkably deep and touching epic here, swiftly demonstrating mastery of character, story, and yes, world-building.

Inside Pale City, the orphan Zet is suddenly affected by the “most evil creature alive”. And ever-curious, young Zet sneaks around, finding out more about this creature, at the risk of his sanity and his life.

The magic of Kroma #1 is in the ability of De Felici to weave a mood and atmosphere into the book from the very start. Where lesser writers delve into scenarios and back story, De Felici tosses us straight into violent action and suspense. Yes, we can learn about the characters as we go along! YES, they reveal a little of themselves while the action proceeds!! We are moving, exploring, mystified by where we are being led!

The artwork is sublime. De Felici has an eye for shape and tone, for sure. The large domed buildings, the elastic poses of the children, the abrupt changes in lighting to enhance mood. The expressions, the lighting, and yes, the colouring. Lettering is by Rus Wooton. Oh, this book is so darn good. Just buy a copy already!!

Image, Kroma #1, $7.99 for 48 pages of story content plus preview pages and text. Teen Plus

Alan Spinney

About Alan Spinney

After a career of graphic design, art direction and copywriting, I still have a passion for words and pictures. I love it when a comic book comes together; the story is tight, and the drawings lead me forward. Art with words... the toughest storytelling technique to get right. Was this comic book worth your money? Let's see!!